Dear readers and fellow bloggers:

We are celebrating the Second Anniversary of our medical and literary page in May and we would like to thank all of you for a sustained and affectionate support for our work. My children and I are very grateful for the incredible success of this page. It would not have been possible without you snatching a few minutes out of your busy schedules to take a look at our articles and, in a some instances, even put some nice commentaries.

The image of this blog shows the extraordinary moment when Diego Maradona, the star of the 1986 Argentine football team that won the World Cup in 1986, pushes the ball with his hand past the English goalkeeper to score a decisive goal in the quarter finals. He blatantly cheated and made no apologies about it. On the contrary. When he was asked afterwards what had happened, he insolently replied: “it was the Hand of God.”

Likewise we would like to tell  you that this intellectual endeavor would not have been possible without the providential intervention of a higher authority: your kind support. Every day we sit down early in the morning to study and write at our desk, we have you in mind as we strive to provide you with a concise yet complete account of medical breakthroughs and the varied experiences of a physician practicing for more than 30 years. We might have dreamed of accomplishing this feat entirely on our own. No way. We carried on with our task because we counted on many readers and bloggers like you.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce the preface of our new manuscript titled “Emotional frustration-the hushed plague”, which we are eagerly writing at present. Please read it and send us your opinion in order to steer a better course.

Thank you for all the help and attention you had granted us in these two years. We promise to continue our efforts to bring you the very best that we can offer.

What do you think? Please tell us.

Don’t leave us alone.

28 thoughts on “The “hand of God”

  1. I can’t leave you alone even if I tried (though you can get mad at me at times, as well as make me mad).
    God morning, dear. To ensure it stays good and you enjoy your mate almagro, I have to leave a comment asap.

    Your post does answer my questions, thank you. Now, make sure you include the comment box in the Preface section too, and for the time being I’ll leave mine here.

    As for your reference to our beloved Flaubert again, I have to share a thought of a Guardian “critic” who saw Madame Bovary as a bourgeois narcissist in 19th-century France who was destroyed by her daydreams. Go figure. Interestingly, she mentions her background, along with the fact that she worked as an au pair in the French provinces in the 1950s, and read the book in French. She further describes the book as the least romantic one ever and the only conclusion I could make was that the poor thing was afraid of getting stuck in provincial life and being trapped in a house and kitchen. As opposed to Anna Karenina whom she sees as tragic, Emma Bovary is small-minded, confused and selfish, only to add in the end she’s kind of tragic too.

    There’s indeed a thin line separating tragedy and comedy in life. As a smart man said once, many people have ambition, but not everybody has abilities.

    What do you think dottore? I hope you’ll never leave me alone. Friends?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good morning dear Bo and thanks for your excellent commentary. Yes. she might have been a petit-bourgeois narcissist, but that does not invalidate Madame Bovary’s strong emotional frustration with the pettinesss of her provincial life. We must thread carefully in that aspect because oftentimes the malicious agents of the patriarchal institutions have tried to deflect the conversation about the social and financial oppression of the feminine genre by smearing the personal attributes of the few brave women that dare to speak up. What if she was vain? Or fat? Or ugly? Or mean?
      The message is what really counts. Do you agree dear? Un grosso baccione. A posto!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m glad we agree on this one, dear.
        Though Flaubert continues to challenge our morality a century and a half later with his petite anti-heroine, I can’t help but wonder if such stories are still considered scandalous or we’re hypocritical, as usual. Who can blame a Desperate Housewife?! The only choice she seems to have is to be desperate. Oh wait, there is one more: escapism, right? (however narcissistic it may be).
        Let feminists and false moralists be shocked. Oh vanity, my worst sin!

        Despite Emma’s many flaws, we can’t deny that she was a bourgeois sex revolutionary, can we?
        She might be tragic, but at least she did try. I challenge the critics to find their own raison d’être.

        I’ve started watching Mad Men on Netflix, which was recommended by an ex student who I thought very highly of. If you didn’t have a chance to see it, please do, as you’re going to find countless examples of frustrated desperate housewives.
        Btw, I finished La casa de papel and I absolutely loved it. Thanks for this one. I got so hooked that now I miss all of them terribly, especially Berlin. Oh, dottore, why are women attracted to villains so much? We love them regardless, knowing they’ll drag us down when they start sinking.

        Have a nice day, dear. It’s always a pleasure talking to you.

        Like

      2. So glad that we are in the same wavelength about Emma. If we men start treating women a little bit better, just a tiny bit, they might stop being so bitchy with us. Don’t you agree dear? Oh I’m glad you liked “La Casa de papel” and Berlin in particular. That guy is a real badass in real life too, He just visited Buenos Aires and was escorted all around by her friend Mora Godoy, a great dancer with her own company that tours the whole planet. What did he do? He sent her a love letter, not by mail, not by courier, but by publishing it in one of the most read city newspapers. Isn’t that BEAUTIFULLY BAD?
        Do not suffer more please. They are coming back due to popular demand in a third season and they started filming it already. Un altro baccione.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. That’s great news. I’m ready to forgive him every sin he’s guilty of. If only he could come back to life! But then, everything’s allowed in movies, right?
        Guys like that don’t change. Or maybe they do, for love. Our ideas of love may radically differ, but c’est la vie. So, we stick to our bitchiness after all.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Congrats, meiner Liebe. Two years IS a great success and to see what you have written so far is truly stunning, not to mention the quality of your work.

    Now, I’m curious about something. You mention your kids and talk in plural. Does it mean they are involved in your blog and how?

    Once again, all the best in your future endeavors and I’m looking forward already to each and every post you write.

    Yours most devoted reader,
    Bo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much my dear Bo. I’m honoured by your following. What a pity you didn’t hit the hot link to the Preface. Then you would have found out how my kids are involved….C’est la vie!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ftr, it’s open but no time now. What a pity you misjudged me again. I’m pretty thorough once I start something. I’m sure you noticed it.
        Oui, c’est la vie, but there’s always more to it than meets the eye, dear.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I can’t figure out if you got up on the wrong side of the bed or you just hold a grudge for….how long again?
        I’m gonna pretend you still care. Actually, I know you do. You’re just terribly sensitive today and I can’t hold it against you because you’re my friend and because we care. We do not judge.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Dr. Sahib, thank you so very much for sharing your thoughts on the Second Anniversary of your ‘medical and literary page’. Your positive attitude and magnetic personality attract friends and well-wishers. There is always something to learn from your write-up.
    The image of Diego Maradona was actually tarnished in our eyes after knowing this sordid and to lap God in this awesome.
    Your endeavor to keep us updated is laudable to say the least. Your current book would be an eye-opener for the readers.
    A word of thank for what you have done.
    With regards,
    HARBANS

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good morning and thanks for your nice commentary. Event though I do not deserve so much effusive adulation, I have to confess that I love it. Keep sending it this way.I am looking forward to many more intellectually invigorating exchanges across the oceans, my dear spiritual friend. Au revoir!

      P.S. You are right. Diego Maradona was (and still is ) a totally irreverent and shady character. But the Argentinians (my cousins) unabashedly chuckle with his foul play because it eliminated the hated English from the competition, And that’s something that you Indians can understand well, can’t you?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Good Morning Dr. Sahib.

        It would be my sincere endeavour to do so in future too because I do gain immensely from your write-up. Your writings are intellectually uplifting and take us to spiritual plane because you also associate heart in your efforts to connect with the people in general.

        Fact remains we Indians cannot forget the history!

        With regards,

        HARBANS

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Good morning and thanks for your continued support. We certainly have pleasure in our intellectual exchanges with a little tryst of humor. I also liked you totally diplomatic response about “hating the English.” Definitely. Even if the victors wrote their version, the historical facts cannot be concealed for long.
        Arrivederci!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Good morning Dr. Sahib. My grateful thanks for your response. It is really a treat to connect with intellectual like you and converse.

        Thanks again for keeping the tap of knowledge-flowing/

        REGARDS

        HARBANS

        Liked by 1 person

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