Masturbation during Social Isolation – Part I

The enforced social isolation during the pandemic for millions of people around the globe will exacerbate certain personal and community tensions that have been latent for many decades. One of them is the issue of Onanism which, in spite of being as old as Mankind itself, has taken a new twist due to the cloistering of so many single persons without the possibility of going out to meet a partner. In order to start the much needed and long postponed discussion, we will first transcribe what we already wrote about this issue in our upcoming book “Emotional Frustration – the hushed plague”

-“Doctor…Before serving a dish to a customer, got to try it myself.”

Tanya X. is the feisty, lesbian sous-chef of a posh beach resto that jokingly told us that, despite having a partner, she used “self-stimulation” as an appetizer. There is a high prevalence of masturbation in the USA[i], both amongst the young and adult persons, but it is still considered as a taboo issue in most public forums. Despite a strong social opposition, that practice is slowly “coming out.”

The National Health and Social Life Survey, administered by the University of Chicago, showed that in the 18-60 years old segment, 38% of women and 61% of men said that they had at least one episode the previous year. The masturbation-partnered sex linkage had a bimodal presentation for both genders as it was both a compensation for an unsatisfying sex life and an addition to a satisfying one too.

Yvonne Fulbright, a relationship expert and writer, said: “how to stimulate the ‘hot spots’, whether your own or your lover’s, can be a piece of cake—that is once you know the recipe. The secret to becoming a rave-inspiring ‘masterchef’ in the bedroom is knowing when (and how) to throw in a dash of this or a pinch of that, let the things simmer a bit or even mix up the ingredients. It’s also important to know why the right blend makes things so sweet.” [ii] A personalized cookbook.

Researchers at the Kinsey Institute [iii] interviewed more than a thousand heterosexual Australians about what they usually hide below the bedsheets. The data showed that only 61.6% of women claimed to reach an orgasm during sexual intercourse compared to almost 85.5% of men that claimed they did. Almost 38% of the participating women said that they needed stimulation of the clitoris to reach an orgasm in 75% of the sexual encounters they had had; the investigators  stated that previous clinical studies did not fully address the issue of clitoral stimulation.

Stay distant. Stay safe. Stay beautiful.

(This article is based on our upcoming new book Emotional Frustration – the hushed plague)

What do you think? Please tell us.

Don’t leave me alone.

References

[i] Das A.“Masturbation in the United States”, Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy 2007 Jul-Sep:33(4)301-17.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17541849

[ii] Yvonne K. Fulbright, “Touch me there. A hands-on Guide to your Orgasmic Hot Spots”, Hunter House, Kindle edition. https://hunterhouse.com

[iii] https://kinseyinstitute.org/pdf/womens%20orgasm%20annual%20review.pdf